Ives in The Lost Days In   The   Lost   Days,   the   third   book   in   the   series,   readers   experience   Ives   on   a   different   level:   quiet,   stoic,   regretful,   pensive   and   a   bit   lost,   yet   still   in complete   command   of   his   actions,   emotions   and   thoughts.   In   a   way,   he   is   strangely   deliberate.   Perhaps   Walzinski   observation   said   it   best   in book   one:   Drowning   in   those   personal   ideals,   Ives   looked   away   and   his   tears   tumbled   to   his   shirtfront.   It   was   nearly   impossible   for   Walzinski   to watch   this   display   of   powerlessness.   Ives   commanded   so   many,   while   he   bore   the   burdens   of   his   country   in   one   hand,   and   tempered   his   power with   justice   and   wisdom   in   the   other.   To   control   so   many   lives,   but   not   control   your   own   life,   was   a   prime   seat   between   the   proverbial   rock   and   a hard place.  Once   again,   Ives   was   is   in   that   place.   He   cannot   go   back   to   the   way   it   was   before   the   disaster   at   the   end   of   The   Chase,   and   determining   how   to continue   is   a   task   he   alone   must   figure   out.   The   reader   is   included   in   his   deepest   and   most   private   thoughts   and   emotions.   They   live   with   him, his   doubts   and   fears;   however,   they   also   live   his   trust   in   God   as   he   continues   to   give   his   entire   life   over   to   God.   Trust   is   a   fragile   emotion   and sometimes, time is the key to it. Through all the pain, Ives knows God’s timing is best. From   all   he   has   been   through,   there   are   two   distinct   personas   to   Ives:   the   first   is   his   outer   persona   that   is   the   influential   government   agent   as he   is   the   second   most   powerful   man   in   law   enforcement   in   the   world.   The   second,   the   inner   man,   is   a   man   humbled   by   events   which   he   could not   control.   Coming   to   terms   with   his   lack   of   control   is   an   ever-constant   lesson.   An   invisible   dragon   he   must   slay,   which   is   the   complete opposite   of   his   life   as   a   special   agent   with   the   Bureau.   With   them,   he   knows   who   his   targets   are.   They   are   flesh   and   blood,   but   now   he   has   to cope with the invisible. And he does so by deep contemplation of the events in his life. Ives   knows   that   the   essence   of   the   inner   man   is   to   always   search   for   truth.   So,   in   book   three,   when   a   strange   man   comes   on   the   scene,   talking about   Allina,   Ives’   “Spidey   Sense”   is   immediately   alerted.   We’ve   seen   it   before.   In   book   one   when   he   circles   around   the   block   to   find   Allina   and the   dogs   as   it   reads:   Turning   to   face   forward,   he   shook   his   head   at   the   anxious   sensation   that   persisted;   he   felt   as   if   that   would   be   the   last   time he   would   see   her.   “Drive   around   the   block   and   find   Mrs.   Andrich   and   the   boys,”   he   ordered,   then   he   called   his   office   to   say   he   would   be   late   for his   appointment.   In   book   two   when   talking   to   his   longtime   friend,   Dr.   Richard   Blandings,   about   Shepherd’s   next   move   it   reads:   “Or   he   may   die doing   it,”   Ives   said.   Just   then,   he   got   a   knot   in   the   pit   of   his   stomach   and   an   odd   surge,   like   a   shiver,   ran   up   the   length   of   his   spine.   In   book   three, he   has   more   ominous   feelings   of   dread.   But   it   is   up   to   the   reader   to   determine   if   it   is   his   extreme   connection   to   Allina,   is   God   speaking   to   him,   is it his bureau training, or a combination of all of them. Through   all   his   trials   in   his   life   and   career,   this   situation,   where   Allina   goes   missing   and   is   declared   dead   by   the   bureau,   Ives   faith   is   tested beyond   anything   he   could   have   imagined   for   himself.   However,   he   endures   and   his   faith   in   God’s   ability   to   turn   all   wrongs   into   something   for   His glory   is   rewarded   as   he   is   proven   right,   that   Allina   did   not   die   when   she   stepped   off   that   pier   and   fell   into   the   storm   ridden   waters   of   the   Lower Narrows of the New York Harbor. But what happens next, is a new twist in the plot of Ives’ life.
IVES ANDRICH A Man Among Men Part Three
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IVES ANDRICH A Man Among Men Part Three

© 2017 ∞ Copyright by The Black Rose & Andrich Publishing. All rights reserved.

Ives in The Lost Days In   The   Lost   Days,   the   third   book   in   the   series,   readers experience     Ives     on     a     different     level:     quiet,     stoic, regretful,   pensive   and   a   bit   lost,   yet   still   in   complete command   of   his   actions,   emotions   and   thoughts.   In   a way,    he    is    strangely    deliberate.    Perhaps    Walzinski observation    said    it    best    in    book    one:    Drowning    in those   personal   ideals,   Ives   looked   away   and   his   tears tumbled   to   his   shirtfront.   It   was   nearly   impossible   for Walzinski   to   watch   this   display   of   powerlessness.   Ives commanded   so   many,   while   he   bore   the   burdens   of   his country    in    one    hand,    and    tempered    his    power    with justice   and   wisdom   in   the   other.   To   control   so   many lives,   but   not   control   your   own   life,   was   a   prime   seat between the proverbial rock and a hard place.  Once    again,    Ives    was    is    in    that    place.    He    cannot    go back   to   the   way   it   was   before   the   disaster   at   the   end   of The   Chase,   and   determining   how   to   continue   is   a   task he   alone   must   figure   out.   The   reader   is   included   in   his deepest    and    most    private    thoughts    and    emotions. They   live   with   him,   his   doubts   and   fears;   however,   they also   live   his   trust   in   God   as   he   continues   to   give   his entire   life   over   to   God.   Trust   is   a   fragile   emotion   and sometimes,   time   is   the   key   to   it.   Through   all   the   pain, Ives knows God’s timing is best. From   all   he   has   been   through,   there   are   two   distinct personas   to   Ives:   the   first   is   his   outer   persona   that   is the   influential   government   agent   as   he   is   the   second most   powerful   man   in   law   enforcement   in   the   world. The    second,    the    inner    man,    is    a    man    humbled    by events   which   he   could   not   control.   Coming   to   terms with   his   lack   of   control   is   an   ever-constant   lesson.   An invisible   dragon   he   must   slay,   which   is   the   complete opposite   of   his   life   as   a   special   agent   with   the   Bureau. With   them,   he   knows   who   his   targets   are.   They   are flesh    and    blood,    but    now    he    has    to    cope    with    the invisible.   And   he   does   so   by   deep   contemplation   of   the events in his life. Ives    knows    that    the    essence    of    the    inner    man    is    to always    search    for    truth.    So,    in    book    three,    when    a strange   man   comes   on   the   scene,   talking   about   Allina, Ives’    “Spidey    Sense”    is    immediately    alerted.    We’ve seen   it   before.   In   book   one   when   he   circles   around   the block   to   find   Allina   and   the   dogs   as   it   reads:   Turning   to face     forward,     he     shook     his     head     at     the     anxious sensation   that   persisted;   he   felt   as   if   that   would   be   the last   time   he   would   see   her.   “Drive   around   the   block and   find   Mrs.   Andrich   and   the   boys,”   he   ordered,   then he    called    his    office    to    say    he    would    be    late    for    his appointment.   In   book   two   when   talking   to   his   longtime friend,   Dr.   Richard   Blandings,   about   Shepherd’s   next move   it   reads:   “Or   he   may   die   doing   it,”   Ives   said.   Just then,   he   got   a   knot   in   the   pit   of   his   stomach   and   an   odd surge,   like   a   shiver,   ran   up   the   length   of   his   spine.   In book   three,   he   has   more   ominous   feelings   of   dread. But    it    is    up    to    the    reader    to    determine    if    it    is    his extreme   connection   to   Allina,   is   God   speaking   to   him, is it his bureau training, or a combination of all of them. Through     all     his     trials     in     his     life     and     career,     this situation,    where    Allina    goes    missing    and    is    declared dead     by     the     bureau,     Ives     faith     is     tested     beyond anything   he   could   have   imagined   for   himself.   However, he    endures    and    his    faith    in    God’s    ability    to    turn    all wrongs   into   something   for   His   glory   is   rewarded   as   he is    proven    right,    that    Allina    did    not    die    when    she stepped    off    that    pier    and    fell    into    the    storm    ridden waters   of   the   Lower   Narrows   of   the   New   York   Harbor. But   what   happens   next,   is   a   new   twist   in   the   plot   of Ives’ life.
© 2017 ∞ Copyright by The Black Rose & Andrich Publishing. All rights reserved.
The Black Rose The Non-Fiction, Fiction
 Design by KumaKoo Productions - Manhattan, New York USA
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