Ives in The Chase The unspoken subtitle of The Chase, the second book in the series, has always been Retribution, which could also be dubbed Revenge. As expected, Ives vehemently pursues the book’s first nemesis, David Seagate (the Director of Internal Affairs for the Bureau), who has spent his career taking down remarkably good Special Agents. The reader finds out that Seagate has attempted thirty-six times in Ives’ seventeen-year Bureau career to oust him, but each attempt failed. So, if at first you don’t succeed, aim for someone your enemy loves. That is exactly what Seagate did in book one when he singled out Allina. In book two, we find out what Ives Andrich does to people who do that. As the story progresses, the reader realizes Ives is not responsible for everything that happens to Allina. In fact, so many incidences involving her began long before she and Ives met. She is simply a dominant player in so many other’s plots with Ives as the target. Once Seagate is tackled, along with his creepy sidekick, Dr. Fleming, Ives sets his sights on a new mastermind, Jeffrey Shepherd. Or as Walzinski recited in book one: “The man from the library, Jeff Shepherd, alias Jeff Saravell, alias Tim Walstein, alias, alias, alias.”  Shepherd’s pursuit of Allina is the catalyst for Ives taking the promotion of Chief of Investigation. Now he is the second most powerful man in law enforcement in the world, but even that power has limits. Everything Ives does in under scrutiny and he must use his great “Libra” sense to maintain order and stability while balancing his deeply longed for life with Allina. He is helped by her easy take it as it comes attitude to the situation, cloaking her growing frustration and mounting fear something fatal will happen to Ives. The Chase reveals more about Ives as a man and what he endures to remain the sensible man he is. It also continues to provide insight to his inner character, revealing where he goes for advice. In the world we live in, it is unexpected to hear a man tell that reading The Bible in different languages is where he learned to speak the majority of the languages he does. During the pre-trial hearings of Seagate and Fleming, The Bible is brought up by the defense. The presiding judge, Joseph Forseth, asks Ives how many times he has read The Bible. Ives responds by asking if he should break it down by age and translation. Forseth is stunned, as well as the court, and Ives then proclaims: “Seven times by age nineteen and two times since then.” After that he gives the exact versions in the languages in which he read them—including: Croatian, Latin, Italian, French, English, Greek, Russian and then adds: “I’ve also read all of the Hebrew Bible texts, partly in Hebrew, partly in Greek, and partly in Aramaic.” That alone was enough to make Seagate and Fleming cringe. With this detail, the reader learns more about Ives spirituality when he states, “Every day. In my profession, I need God and His guidance more than anything else.” He paused smiled and added, “Well, that and my wife.” Ives is a man who has his priorities straight. Ives is constantly going through situations that make him grow as a man, but more so, grow as a man strong in his faith in God. Time and time again, he puts worldly things aside to do what he knows is right, what is ingrained deep within him. And no matter the tragedy, his first choice all the way down to his last is to turn to God for help. Granted the tragedies of his life are overpowering, he knows what many humans do not; there is only one power to help. Ives knows that there is only one helper in this world that is all-seeing, all-knowing, and all-powerful. Beyond the shadow of any doubt, far surpassing the advice of any human, demon, or angel, Ives knows only God is unstoppable. As this book draws to its close, he realizes God has allowed him to be broken another time. But to what end, he does not know. And as difficult as it is to accept, he does accept God’s decision to allow the absolute worst thing to happen to him. At the end of The Chase, Ives has morphed yet again into a conglomeration of everything he was before Allina and what is left after the disaster. Within a split second, he goes through a transfiguration that will propel him into his uncertain future. A future he walks warily and blindly into, being led forward by a minuscule glimmer of hope and the promises his tortured mind can recall from God’s word. Ives’ actions prove that despite horrific circumstance, we must go on.
IVES ANDRICH A Man Among Men Part Two
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IVES ANDRICH A Man Among Men Part Two

© 2017 ∞ Copyright by The Black Rose & Andrich Publishing. All rights reserved.

Ives in The Chase The   unspoken   subtitle   of   The   Chase,   the   second   book in    the    series,    has    always    been    Retribution,    which could    also    be    dubbed    Revenge.    As    expected,    Ives vehemently   pursues   the   book’s   first   nemesis,   David Seagate    (the    Director    of    Internal    Affairs    for    the Bureau),     who     has     spent     his     career     taking     down remarkably    good    Special    Agents.    The    reader    finds out    that    Seagate    has    attempted    thirty-six    times    in Ives’   seventeen-year   Bureau   career   to   oust   him,   but each   attempt   failed.   So,   if   at   first   you   don’t   succeed, aim   for   someone   your   enemy   loves.   That   is   exactly what   Seagate   did   in   book   one   when   he   singled   out Allina.    In    book    two,    we    find    out    what    Ives    Andrich does to people who do that. As   the   story   progresses,   the   reader   realizes   Ives   is not   responsible   for   everything   that   happens   to   Allina. In   fact,   so   many   incidences   involving   her   began   long before    she    and    Ives    met.    She    is    simply    a    dominant player   in   so   many   other’s   plots   with   Ives   as   the   target. Once     Seagate     is     tackled,     along     with     his     creepy sidekick,    Dr.    Fleming,    Ives    sets    his    sights    on    a    new mastermind,     Jeffrey     Shepherd.     Or     as     Walzinski recited   in   book   one:   “The   man   from   the   library,   Jeff Shepherd,   alias   Jeff   Saravell,   alias   Tim   Walstein,   alias, alias, alias.”  Shepherd’s    pursuit    of    Allina    is    the    catalyst    for    Ives taking   the   promotion   of   Chief   of   Investigation.   Now he      is      the      second      most      powerful      man      in      law enforcement   in   the   world,   but   even   that   power   has limits.   Everything   Ives   does   in   under   scrutiny   and   he must    use    his    great    “Libra”    sense    to    maintain    order and   stability   while   balancing   his   deeply   longed   for   life with    Allina.    He    is    helped    by    her    easy    take    it    as    it comes   attitude   to   the   situation,   cloaking   her   growing frustration    and    mounting    fear    something    fatal    will happen to Ives. The    Chase    reveals    more    about    Ives    as    a    man    and what   he   endures   to   remain   the   sensible   man   he   is.   It also     continues     to     provide     insight     to     his     inner character,   revealing   where   he   goes   for   advice.   In   the world   we   live   in,   it   is   unexpected   to   hear   a   man   tell that   reading   The   Bible   in   different   languages   is   where he   learned   to   speak   the   majority   of   the   languages   he does.    During    the    pre-trial    hearings    of    Seagate    and Fleming,   The   Bible   is   brought   up   by   the   defense.   The presiding   judge,   Joseph   Forseth,   asks   Ives   how   many times   he   has   read   The   Bible.   Ives   responds   by   asking if    he    should    break    it    down    by    age    and    translation. Forseth   is   stunned,   as   well   as   the   court,   and   Ives   then proclaims:    “Seven    times    by    age    nineteen    and    two times     since     then.”     After     that     he     gives     the     exact versions      in      the      languages      in      which      he      read them—including:      Croatian,      Latin,      Italian,      French, English,   Greek,   Russian   and   then   adds:   “I’ve   also   read all   of   the   Hebrew   Bible   texts,   partly   in   Hebrew,   partly in    Greek,    and    partly    in    Aramaic.”    That    alone    was enough    to    make    Seagate    and    Fleming    cringe.    With this     detail,     the     reader     learns     more     about     Ives spirituality     when     he     states,     “Every     day.     In     my profession,   I   need   God   and   His   guidance   more   than anything    else.”    He    paused    smiled    and    added,    “Well, that   and   my   wife.”   Ives   is   a   man   who   has   his   priorities straight. Ives   is   constantly   going   through   situations   that   make him    grow    as    a    man,    but    more    so,    grow    as    a    man strong    in    his    faith    in    God.    Time    and    time    again,    he puts    worldly    things    aside    to    do    what    he    knows    is right,    what    is    ingrained    deep    within    him.    And    no matter   the   tragedy,   his   first   choice   all   the   way   down to    his    last    is    to    turn    to    God    for    help.    Granted    the tragedies   of   his   life   are   overpowering,   he   knows   what many   humans   do   not;   there   is   only   one   power   to   help. Ives   knows   that   there   is   only   one   helper   in   this   world that      is      all-seeing,      all-knowing,      and      all-powerful. Beyond   the   shadow   of   any   doubt,   far   surpassing   the advice    of    any    human,    demon,    or    angel,    Ives    knows only    God    is    unstoppable.    As    this    book    draws    to    its close,   he   realizes   God   has   allowed   him   to   be   broken another   time.   But   to   what   end,   he   does   not   know.   And as    difficult    as    it    is    to    accept,    he    does    accept    God’s decision   to   allow   the   absolute   worst   thing   to   happen to him. At   the   end   of   The   Chase,   Ives   has   morphed   yet   again into    a    conglomeration    of    everything    he    was    before Allina   and   what   is   left   after   the   disaster.   Within   a   split second,    he    goes    through    a    transfiguration    that    will propel    him    into    his    uncertain    future.    A    future    he walks   warily   and   blindly   into,   being   led   forward   by   a minuscule    glimmer    of    hope    and    the    promises    his tortured     mind     can     recall     from     God’s     word.     Ives’ actions   prove   that   despite   horrific   circumstance,   we must go on.
© 2017 ∞ Copyright by The Black Rose & Andrich Publishing. All rights reserved.
The Black Rose The Non-Fiction, Fiction
 Design by KumaKoo Productions - Manhattan, New York USA
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